USO: Recycling Center Antique Addiction Edition

 

Welcome back to another very exciting Unidentified Scrap Object reveal. Haven’t seen the snippet of this month’s object? Click here and check it out! Each month we bring you a cool new object that we found in our recycling center. We find all kinds of interesting things around here. Bringing them to you with a bit of history is always fun.

 

So let’s get to it. Scroll down to see the reveal of our Unidentified Scrap Object.

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It’s a percolator!

 

Specifically a Landers, Frary & Clark percolator. Landers, Frary & Clark were a manufacturing company located in New Britain Connecticut.

When looking at the bottom of the percolator the first thing that draws my eye are the dates. On further inspection, it appears that these are patent dates. They start with February 6, 1906, the original patent, and go to February 17th, 1914. What this tells me is that most likely this percolator is from between 1906 and 1914. It is pretty old!

The company, as Landers, Frary & Clark, was formed in 1865, though that was not necessarily when the company started. 20 years before that, George Landers was doing business and in 1842 merged with a person named Dewy. What exactly they were making or doing, is unclear to me. In 1852 there was a change in partnership and by 1853 Landers was doing business with a Smith as a stock company. In 1862 Landers purchased Frary & Carey, I am not sure what they did and sometime between then and 1865 the company would be named Landers, Frary & Clark and stay that way until the 60’s. It was around this turn that the company switched (back?) to manufacturing products, cutlery to be exact.

What Every Household (and Recycling Center?) Needs

That was a lot of dates and a lot of moving parts for 20 years. While this company had many names, they would eventually be known for housewares. The company wanted to make products to, “help housewives.” These products included: food scales, coffee grinders, cake mixers, percolators, and many more. With the discovery of electricity, many of these products would become electric.

The percolator was an incredible addition to many households. I am sure it has large contributions to our countries obsession with coffee. It was a simple appliance, it didn’t even have an on off switch. You plugged it in to turn it on and unplugged it to turn it off. Seven minutes got you weak coffee and ten minutes got you strong coffee. No filters needed.

As the years passed many of Landers, Frary & Clark items became very common in American homes, probably why you can find such an old object in a recycling center. While much of it was common, there are items that became collectible. Most notably their pocket knives. Do a quick search online and you can find a good amount of people exchanging information about their knives.

By 1960’s the company came on hard times. In 1960 they closed their cutlery division and by 1965 they sold their electric appliance division to GE.

Landers, Frary & Clark seemed to have contributed a lot to what life looked like in the first half of the century. While the company would eventually sell everything to GE, many of their most notable items are still popular today, though probably more by everyone and not just housewives…

 

I hope you enjoyed this installment of the Unidentified Scrap Object. Check back with us next time for another really interesting object from our recycling center. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook if you have not already.

 

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