USO Reveal: Helixophile?

 

You never know what you will find in a recycling facility. We get in construction and demolition recycling, so many times that means entire homes. Homes always have a history, even when they are sitting in a recycling facility. That is why each month we bring you a new cool object we found in our yard. We show you a snippet of it, let you try to figure out what it is, and then reveal the object the next week!

Are you ready to find out what our object is from last week’s snippet? If you haven’t checked out last week’s post showing a snippet of the object, you can check that out here.

I have one word for you. Helixophile. If you know what that means, then you probably already know what the object is. If you don’t scroll down to find out!

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It is a corkscrew! A pretty cool one. This corkscrew attaches to a table and uses a lever to get the cork out. While this object isn’t old, it was too cool looking to pass up. A few facts about the object. It is created by Legacy and retails for about $60. It is a replica of an antique corkscrew, though I cannot find one that it is supposedly a replica of. My guess is that they made it look like it is antique, and no one questions it.

 

So while I did not have an old object to tell you about, I started to think about what I could tell you about. So I started googling corkscrews. Well, let me tell you, I sure did find a whole world I didn’t know existed.

A Helixophile is a corkscrew enthusiast. Who knew?

 

Steel worms. Arnt I just full of great words today? This was an early name for a cork screw. Steel worms was the variation of gun worms, which were used to clean a musket back in the day, 1680’s to be more specific. The exact reference to the steel worm came from a museum catalog stating, “a steel worme used for the drawing of corks out of bottles”. In 1720 the corkscrew was first used as the topic for a Nicholas Amhurst poem entitled, “The Bottle-Scrue. A Tale”.

While it can be assumed that corkscrews were obviously around long before the 1680’s it was not until 1795 that Samuel Henshall first patented a corkscrew. This variation on it included a disk that prevented the cork from going to deep and forced the seal to break. This variation was used for over 100 years, it was that good.

Many more patents would come. In 1820 Edward Thompson patented the “zig zag” cork screw. (my personal favorite). 1882 brought Carl F.A. Wienke with his patent of the “waiter’s friend”. This one is still popular. In 1888 Dominick Rosati paented “The Wing” which is probably one of the most popular corkscrews now. Many more variations came out through the years, and the continued to.

When I first decided to look at the history of corkscrews, I didn’t know it would be so robust. I learned a couple new words and a wealth of knowledge.

 

Make sure you like us on Facebook and come back next month for another cool object. Who knows what we will find next in our construction and demolition recycling facility.

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